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Eleven influenza-associated pediatric deaths were reported to CDC during week 41 (Georgia [2], Hawaii, Louisiana, Oklahoma [2], Ohio, North Carolina, Oregon, Texas, and Virginia). Nine of these deaths were associated with 2009 influenza A (H1N1) virus infection and two were associated with an influenza A virus for which the subtype is undetermined. These deaths occurred between June 14 and October 10, 2009. One death reported during week 41 occurred during the 2008-09 season. Since August 30, 2009, CDC has received 53 reports of influenza-associated pediatric deaths that occurred during the current influenza season (three deaths in children less than 2 years, seven deaths in children 2-4 years, 21 deaths in children 5-11 years, and 22 deaths in individuals 12-17 years). Forty-seven of the 53 deaths were due to 2009 influenza A (H1N1) virus infections, and the remaining six were associated with influenza A virus for which the subtype is undetermined. A total of 95 deaths in children associated with 2009 H1N1 virus have been reported to CDC.

Among the 53 deaths in children, 32 children had specimens collected for bacterial culture from normally sterile sites and seven (21.9%) of the 32 were positive; Staphylococcus aureus was identified in five (71.4%) of the seven children. One S. aureus isolate was sensitive to methicillin, three were methicillin resistant, and one did not have sensitivity testing performed. All seven children with bacterial coinfections were five years of age or older and four (57.1%) of the seven children were 12 years of age or older.

Influenza-Associated Pediatric Mortality


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

H1N1 Flu (Swine Flu)

Site last updated May 3, 2009, 11:00 AM ET




illness severity, and

  1. Provide information to help health care providers, public health officials and the public address the challenges posed by this emergency.

CDC continues to issue and update interim guidance daily in response to the rapidly evolving situation. CDC will issue updated interim guidance for clinicians on how to identify and care for people who are sick with novel H1N1 flu illness. This guidance will provide priorities for testing and treatment for novel H1N1 flu infection. The priority use for influenza antiviral drugs during this outbreak will be to treat people with severe flu illness.

On May 3, CDC is scheduled to complete deployment of 25 percent of the supplies in the Strategic National Stockpile (SNS) to all states in the continental United States. These supplies and medicines will help states and U.S. territories respond to the outbreak. In addition, the Federal Government and manufacturers have begun the process of developing a vaccine against the novel H1N1 flu virus.

Response actions are aggressive, but they may vary across states and communities depending on local circumstances. Communities, businesses, places of worship, schools and individuals can all take action to slow the spread of this outbreak. People who are sick are urged to stay home from work or school and to avoid contact with others, except to seek medical care. This action can avoid spreading illness further.


Percentage of Visits for Influenza-like Illness (ILI) Reported by the U.S. Outpatient Influenza-like Illness Surveillance Network (ILINet), National Summary 2008-2009 and Previous Two Seasons
(Posted October 23, 2009, 5:30 PM ET, for Week Ending October 17, 2009)

Graph of U.S. patient visits reported for Influenza-like Illness (ILI) for week ending October 10, 2009.


Synopsis:

During week 41 (October 11-17, 2009), influenza activity increased in the U.S.

  • 4,855 (37.5%) specimens tested by U.S. World Health Organization (WHO) and National Respiratory and Enteric Virus Surveillance System (NREVSS) collaborating laboratories and reported to CDC/Influenza Division were positive for influenza.
  • All subtyped influenza A viruses being reported to CDC were 2009 influenza A (H1N1) viruses.
  • The proportion of deaths attributed to pneumonia and influenza (P&I) was above the epidemic threshold.
  • Eleven influenza-associated pediatric deaths were reported. Nine of these deaths were associated with 2009 influenza A (H1N1) virus infection and two were associated with an influenza A virus for which subtype is undetermined.
  • The proportion of outpatient visits for influenza-like illness (ILI) was above the national baseline. All 10 regions reported ILI above region-specific baseline levels.
  • Forty-six states reported geographically widespread influenza activity, Guam and three states reported regional influenza activity, one state, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico reported local influenza activity, and the U.S. Virgin Islands did not report.

National and Regional Summary of Select Surveillance Components

HHS Surveillance Regions*
Data for current week Data cumulative for the season
Out-patient ILI† % positive for flu‡ Number of jurisdictions reporting regional or widespread activity§ A (H1) A (H3) 2009 A (H1N1) A (unable to sub-type)¥ A(Subtyping not performed) B Pediatric Deaths
Nation Elevated 37.5 % 50 of 54 15 34 17,108 270 10,025 68 53
Region 1 Elevated 9.0 % 6 of 6 5 2 268 2 27 3 0
Region 2 Elevated 6.1 % 2 of 4 1 5 91 0 72 2 0
Region 3 Elevated 49.4 % 5 of 6 1 5 2,694 11 313 6 4
Region 4 Elevated 28.9 % 8 of 8 0 1 2,537 48 2,830 8 16
Region 5 Elevated 37.3 % 6 of 6 3 14 2,618 69 399 6 3
Region 6 Elevated 20.5 % 5 of 5 0 3 1,495 3 2,932 5 19
Region 7 Elevated 45.4 % 4 of 4 3 2 1,641 122 501 10 1
Region 8 Elevated 32.4 % 6 of 6 2 0 2,547 0 2,525 24 5
Region 9 Elevated 24.3 % 4 of 5 0 1 2,163 11 351 3 2
Region 10 Elevated 36.8 % 4 of 4 0 1 1,054 4 75 1 3

*Influenza season officially begins each year at week 40. This season data from week 35 will be included to show the trend of influenza activity before the official start of the 2009-10 influenza season.
**HHS regions (Region 1 CT, ME, MA, NH, RI, VT; Region 2: NJ, NY, Puerto Rico, US Virgin Islands; Region 3: DE, DC, MD, PA, VA, WV; Region 4: AL, FL, GA, KY, MS, NC, SC, TN; Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI; Region 6: AR, LA, NM, OK, TX; Region 7: IA, KS, MO, NE; Region 8: CO, MT, ND, SD, UT, WY; Region 9: AZ, CA, Guam, HI, NV; and Region 10: AK, ID, OR, WA).
† Elevated means the % of visits for ILI is at or above the national or region-specific baseline
‡ National data are for current week; regional data are for the most recent three weeks
§ Includes all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico, and U.S. Virgin Islands
¥ The majority of influenza A viruses that cannot be sub-typed as seasonal influenza viruses are 2009 A (H1N1) influenza viruses upon further testing

U.S. Virologic Surveillance:

WHO and NREVSS collaborating laboratories located in all 50 states and Washington D.C. report to CDC the number of respiratory specimens tested for influenza and the number positive by influenza type and subtype. The results of tests performed during the current week are summarized in the table below.


Week 41
No. of specimens tested 12,943
No. of positive specimens (%) 4,855 (37.5%)
Positive specimens by type/subtype
  Influenza A 4,844 (99.8%)
             A (2009 H1N1)              3,378 (69.7%)
             A (subtyping not performed)              1,436 (29.6%)
             A (unable to subtype)              30 (0.6%)
             A (H3)              0 (0.0%)
             A (H1)             0 (0.0%)
  Influenza B 11 (0.2%)


U.S. Human Cases of H1N1 Flu Infection
(As of May 15, 2009, 11:00 AM ET)
States* Confirmed and Probable Cases Deaths
Alabama
55
 
Arkansas
2
 
Arizona
435
1
California
504
 
Colorado
55
 
Connecticut
47
 
Delaware
60
 
Florida
68
 
Georgia
18
 
Hawaii
10
 
Idaho
5
 
Illinois
638
 
Indiana
71
 
Iowa
66
 
Kansas
30
 
Kentucky**
13
 
Louisiana
57
 
Maine
14
 
Maryland
28
 
Massachusetts
135
 
Michigan
142
 
Minnesota
36
 
Missouri
19
 
Montana
4
 
Nebraska
27
 
Nevada
26
 
New Hampshire
18
 
New Jersey
14
 
New Mexico
68
 
New York
242
 
North Carolina
12
 
North Dakota
2
 
Ohio
14
 
Oklahoma
26
 
Oregon
94
 
Pennsylvania
47
 
Rhode Island
8
 
South Carolina
36
 
South Dakota
4
 
Tennessee
74
 
Texas
506
2
Utah
91
 
Vermont
1
 
Virginia
21
 
Washington
246
1
Washington, D.C.
12
 
Wisconsin
613
 
TOTAL*(47)
4,714 cases
4 deaths

*includes the District of Columbia

More on the Situation

U.S. Human Cases of H1N1 Flu Infection
(As of May 7, 2009, 11:00 AM ET)
States Laboratory
confirmed
cases
Deaths
Alabama 4  
Arizona 48  
California 106  
Colorado 17  
Connecticut 4  
Delaware 38  
Florida 5  
Georgia 3  
Hawaii 3  
Idaho 1  
Illinois 204  
Indiana 15  
Iowa 5  
Kansas 7  
Kentucky* 2  
Louisiana 7  
Maine 4  
Maryland 4  
Massachusetts 71  
Michigan 9  
Minnesota 1  
Missouri 4  
Nebraska 4  
Nevada 5  
New Hampshire 2  
New Jersey 7  
New Mexico 8  
New York 98  
North Carolina 7  
Ohio 5  
Oklahoma 1  
Oregon 15  
Pennsylvania 2  
Rhode Island 2  
South Carolina
17
 
Tennessee
2
 
Texas
91
2
Utah 8  
Virginia
11
 
Washington 23  
Wisconsin
26
 
TOTAL (41) 896 cases 2 deaths

International Human Cases of Swine Flu Infection
See: World Health OrganizationExternal Web Site Policy.

What You Can Do to Stay Healthy

  • Stay informed. This website will be updated regularly as information becomes available.
  • Influenza is thought to spread mainly person-to-person through coughing or sneezing of infected people.
  • Take everyday actions to stay healthy.
    • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
    • Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after you cough or sneeze. Alcohol-based hands cleaners are also effective.
    • Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth. Germs spread that way.
    • Stay home if you get sick. CDC recommends that you stay home from work or school and limit contact with others to keep from infecting them.
  • Follow public health advice regarding school closures, avoiding crowds and other social distancing measures.
  • Develop a family emergency plan as a precaution. This should include storing a supply of food, medicines, facemasks, alcohol-based hand rubs and other essential supplies.
  • Call 1-800-CDC-INFO for more information.

NOTE: This is a rapidly evolving situation and current guidance and other web content may contain variations in how this new H1N1 virus of swine origin is referred to. Over the coming days and weeks, these inconsistencies will be addressed, but in the interests of meeting the agency's response goals, all guidance will remain posted and new guidance will continue to be issued.

  • Links to non-federal organizations are provided solely as a service to our users. These links do